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long divison helper

Page history last edited by Larry Lueck 12 years, 3 months ago

This is the long disvion helper. Here is a helper on partial quotients 

                

                                    

Step One: Setting Up the Problem

The first step in the partial quotient approach is to set up the problem. This looks much like a traditional long division problem except that a horizontal line gets drawn along the right side of the problem to create space for the student to track "partial quotients." 

           

Step Two: Picking Easy Multiples

The question in the mind of the student is simple: "How many groups of nine are there in 2,079?" The partial quotient method tries to get the student to the answer through basic logic. So the next question the student asks is, "Well, are there at least blank number of groups of nine in 2,079?" Fill in the blank with a number the student is comfortable with - let's say 100. So the question becomes "Well, are there at least 100 groups of nine in 2,079?" The student does the math and figures that 100 groups of nine (100 x 9) is 900. The student writes 100 in the partial quotient column and writes 900 under 2,079 in the problem template; then he does the subtraction to see how much is left.

 

Step Three: Can I Do That Again?

With 1,179 left in his dividend, the student should ask this basic question: "Can I take that many out

again?" If the answer is "yes" (like in this case), the student should do that. If the answer is "no," the student has to find a smaller easy multiple to take out. In this case the student writes 100 in the partial quotient column again and writes 900 under 1,179 in the problem template; then he does the subtraction again to see how much is left.

 

Step Four: Can I Do One More Time?

With 279 left in his dividend, the student should ask that basic, logical question again: "Can I take that many out one more time?" If the answer is "yes," the student should do that. But in this case the answer now is "no," so the student has to find a smaller easy multiple to take out. Let's assume this student is not very good with "nines" yet and decides to just take 10 "nines" out. The student writes 10 in the partial quotient column and writes 90 under 279 in the problem template; then he does the subtraction to see how much is left. Since the dividend left is still more than ninety, the student can repeat this step two more times

 

Step Five: Add up the Partial Quotients

When the student has taken this process as far as possible (the dividend left is less than the divisor) the final step is easy: add up the partial quotients to get the whole quotient. The student in this particular case will add 100+100+10+10+10+1 and get 231. There are 231 groups of nine in 2,079. Or, phrased more traditionally, 2,079 divided by 9 is 231

 

Comments (17)

maddie said

at 11:53 am on Jan 10, 2009

wow we filled alot of information out
all ready.

ryan said

at 3:01 pm on Jan 10, 2009

good job

sadie said

at 3:04 pm on Jan 10, 2009

i added the content

sadie said

at 4:05 pm on Jan 10, 2009

i think this is a good referral

Larry Lueck said

at 10:43 pm on Jan 11, 2009

I think we should have a student record this process using the Promethean board to show the video on these steps. I can work on getting it together this week and we can try to have it up by the end of the quarter for sure. I think students and parents would like to see it done.

You up for it, Maddie?

emmett said

at 8:31 am on Jan 12, 2009

why only Maddie???

emmett said

at 6:31 pm on Jan 12, 2009

I think it is to hard to understand without an example or pictures on it.

Larry Lueck said

at 4:44 pm on Jan 13, 2009

I would like Maddie to do it since she is the one that put this explanation on the page. Anyone can actually do it if they want...I am open to that.

sadie said

at 7:04 pm on Jan 13, 2009

Mr.lueck i put the explanation on

Larry Lueck said

at 3:04 pm on Jan 15, 2009

Then you should be the first to make the video! Anyone else can work to make one as well. Maybe another math process or algorithm.

Aidan said

at 8:50 pm on Jan 15, 2009

The problem with making the video is that you would have to upgrade the wiki to a different package that costs money

maddie said

at 11:42 am on Jan 17, 2009

Good Thinking

Larry Lueck said

at 9:35 pm on Jan 17, 2009

There are other ways to show the video on here.

mckenna said

at 5:51 pm on Jan 27, 2009

is there any way we can make a page that shows a long divison problem?

maddie said

at 5:57 pm on Feb 4, 2009

I am up for it

Larry Lueck said

at 10:38 pm on Feb 5, 2009

You can add a scan or other image that shows the division process. We can scan it at school and upload it like a jpg (digital picture).

josh said

at 6:32 pm on Feb 17, 2009

mr.lueck will every one get a chance to do it?

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